Search

  • January

    2024 Campsite Reservation Information

    Campers may now make their reservations 180 days in advance and picnic shelter reservations 360 days in advance. Recreation.gov is taking reservations at this toll free telephone number, 1-877-444-6777. Campers can also make reservations on the Web at http://www.recreation.gov/.Notice! http://www.recreation.gov/ also has maps and more information
  • April

    2024 Huntington District Campground Schedule

    Campers may now make their reservations 180 days in advance and picnic shelter reservations 360 days in advance. Recreation.gov is taking reservations at this toll free telephone number, 1-877-444-6777. Campers can also make reservations on the Web at http://www.recreation.gov/.
  • January

    Alum Creek Lake

    Alum Creek rests amid the fertile agricultural till plains and river valleys of Delaware County. Alum Creek offers a diverse array of natural features. Cliffs of Ohio shale, the muddy remains of an ancient sea, are notable in many areas, both within the park and at nearby Highbanks Metro Park and Shale Hollow Metro Park.
  • Atwood Lake

    Atwood lake is located on the Indian Fork of the Conotton Creek, 4 miles southeast of New Cumberland, Ohio, and 18 miles east of Dover, Ohio, in Tuscarawas County, on State Route 212. Atwood Lake was constructed primarily for flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife management
  • Barren River Lake

    Welcome to Barren River Lake. The lake is situated in the rural, rolling hills of Allen, Barren and Monroe counties in South Central Kentucky.  The dam is located 12 miles east of Scottsville, KY and 15 miles southwest of Glasgow, KY on State Highway 252. Barren River Lake covers 20,150 acres at maximum flood control pool and 10,000 acres at normal summer pool.
  • Beach City Lake

    Beach City Dam is located near the northern border of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, on Sugar Creek, a tributary of the Tuscarawas River, about nine miles above New Philadelphia, Ohio. The dam was completed in 1936 for flood control and water conservation in the Muskingum Watershed area.
  • Beech Fork Lake

    Beech Fork Lake is part of the integrated flood reduction system operated by the Corps of Engineers for the entire Ohio River Basin. When these lakes are operated as a vast storage system, flood crests along the Ohio can be significantly reduced. Beech Fork Lake opened for recreational activities in May 1978. Beech Fork Lake is near the community of Lavalette, Wayne County, West Virginia, approximately 10 miles south of Huntington.
  • Berlin Lake

    Take time out to enjoy the ever-changing pattern of life and scenery that await you at Berlin Lake. Located near Akron, Youngstown, and Warren, Ohio the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers invites you to trade the sights and sounds of the city for those of the Ohio countryside.
  • Black Rock Lock

    About the LockThe Black Rock Channel extends from Buffalo Harbor to the Black Rock Lock.  It is three and one-half miles in length.  The Federal navigation channel has a minimum width of 200 feet. Pleasure craft are required to yield the right-of-way to commercial vessels due to the confined waters of the channel.The Black Rock Lock and the Black
  • Bluestone Lake

    Bluestone Dam spans the New River at Hinton, WV forming Bluestone Lake, the third largest lake in West Virginia. At summer pool Bluestone Lake covers 2,040 acres and is 10.7 miles long. Bluestone Dam was constructed as part of the Kanawha River Basin flood control system primarily to reduce major flood damages along the New, Kanawha, Ohio, and Mississippi Rivers. Bluestone Dam was completed for operational purposes in January 1949 and completely finished in January 1952.
  • Bolivar Dam

    Bolivar Dam is on Sandy Creek of the Tuscarawas River, 183.4 miles above the mouth of the Muskingum River, located in Stark and Tuscarawas Counties of Ohio. The Dam has an impervious core with a cut-off trench and is flanked by pervious zones. The embankment has a maximum height of 87 feet, a crest length of 6300 feet, and a crest width of 25 feet. Constructed primarily for flood control, the maximum flood control pool level of elevation 962.00 feet would encompass 6500 surface acres.
  • Brookville Lake

    Welcome to the Brookville Lake. The lake is located in Franklin and Union counties on the East Fork of the Whitewater River. The dam is about one-half mile above Brookville, Indiana, and 36 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • Buckhorn Lake

    Welcome to the Buckhorn Lake. The lake is situated in Leslie and Perry counties on the Middle Fork of the Kentucky River in the foothills of the Cumberland Plateau, offering the scenic beauty of the Appalachian Mountain Range. The dam is located near the small community of Buckhorn, Ky., about 100 miles southeast of Lexington and 30 miles west of Hazard. The 1,230 acre Buckhorn Lake and surrounding area offers a wide variety of outdoor recreation opportunities. The Corps, in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky manages the land and water for wildlife, fisheries and recreation.
  • Burnsville Lake

    Burnsville Dam is located in Braxton County on the Little Kanawha River, 124 miles above its confluence with the Ohio River and approximately 3 miles above the Town of Burnsville, West Virginia. Burnsville Dam was developed to reduce flooding on the Little Kanawha River, which runs 167 miles and drains an area of 2,320 square miles, and is a unit in the Corps' Ohio River Basin Flood Reduction System.
  • C.J. Brown Dam & Reservoir

    Welcome to the C. J. Brown Dam and Reservoir. The lake is located near Springfield in west central Ohio, less than a day's drive from Indianapolis, Cleveland, Louisville or Toledo. The 2,120 acre lake provides flood reduction and a whole lot more. The C. J. Brown Region offers many opportunities to enjoy wildlife or recreate in the great outdoors. 
  • Caesar Creek Lake

    Welcome to the Caesar Creek Lake. The lake is located in Warren, Clinton and Greene counties in southwestern Ohio. The dam is three miles above the mouth of Caesar Creek, a tributary of the Little Miami River. The 2,830-acre lake provides flood reduction and a whole lot more. The Caesar Creek Region offers many opportunities to enjoy wildlife or recreate in the great outdoors.
  • Cagles Mill Lake

    Welcome to the Cagles Mill Lake. The lake lies in Putnam and Owen counties in south-central Indiana, approximately midway between Indianapolis and Terre Haute. The area is picturesque with rolling hills surrounded by streams and creeks. The dam is located on Mill Creek 2.8 miles above its mouth. Cagles Mill Lake bears the name of an old grist mill that was just downstream from the lake on Mill Creek.
  • Carr Creek Lake

    Welcome to the Carr Creek Lake. The lake is located in the mountainous region of southeastern Kentucky, about 16 miles from Hazard and 18 miles from Whitesburg. The dam is located 8.8 miles above the mouth of Carr Fork, a tributary of the North Fork of the Kentucky River. The 710 acre lake and surrounding area offers a wide variety of outdoor recreation opportunities. The Corps, in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky, manages the land and water for wildlife, fisheries and recreation.
  • Cave Run Lake

    Welcome to the Cave Run Lake. The lake is located within the scenic Eastern Highlands Region of Kentucky and is almost completely surrounded by the northern-most section of the Daniel Boone National Forest. An earth and rockfill dam built across the Licking River created Cave Run Lake. The 8,270 acre Cave Run Lake is most widely known for its outdoor recreation opportunities, excellent fishing and scenic beauty. However, the lake project was constructed primarily for the purpose of reducing flood damage.
  • Cecil M. Harden Lake

    Welcome to Cecil M. Harden Lake. Cecil M. Harden Lake (also known as Raccoon Lake), located in west central Indiana, lies predominantly in Parke County and extends into Putnam County.  The dam is on Big Raccoon Creek 33 miles upstream of its juncture with the Wabash River.  It is approximately 25 miles northeast of Terre Haute, 50 miles west of Indianapolis, and 15 miles north of Brazil.
  • Center Hill Lake

    The Nashville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes you to Center Hill Lake.  The lake provides varied outdoor recreation opportunities for millions of visitors each year.  Because of the temperate climate and relatively long recreation season, visitors have numerous activities to choose from including fishing, hunting, camping,
  • Charles Mill Lake

    Charles Mill Dam is located on the Black Fork of the Mohican River, 10 miles east of Mansfield and 10 miles southwest of Ashland, Ohio. The lake is located in Ashland and Richland counties with the dam being located in Ashland County. Charles Mill Dam was constructed in 1935-36 and is primarily for flood control but also for recreation and fish and wildlife management.
  • Cheatham Lake

    The Nashville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes you to Cheatham Lake.  The lake provides a variety of outdoor recreational opportunities for millions of visitors each year.  Because of the temperate climate and relatively long recreation season, visitors have numerous activities from which to choose, including: fishing, hunting,
  • Clendening Lake

    Clendening Lake is located in Harrison County, Ohio on the Brushy Fork of the Stillwater Creek, 1/2 mile east of Tippecanoe, Ohio, and 9 miles southeast of Uhrichsville, Ohio.  Clendening Lake was constructed in 1937.  It was built for flood damage reduction, recreation, and fish and wildlife management.  
  • Conemaugh River Lake

    An abundance of cultural resources and recreational opportunities coupled with a great river revival and trail has certainly made Conemaugh River Lake the place to be for outdoor fun!
  • Cordell Hull Lake

    The Nashville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes you to Cordell Hull Lake.  The lake provides a variety of outdoor recreational opportunities for millions of visitors each year.  Because of the temperate climate and relatively long recreation season, visitors have numerous activities from which to choose, including: fishing, hunting,
  • Crooked Creek Lake

    Nestled among the rolling hills of western Pennsylvania, Crooked Creek Lake is an ideal setting for year-round outdoor activities. Located only 30 miles northeast of Pittsburgh, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers invites you to discover the scenic beauty of the lake and surrounding countryside. Visitors will find they can pursue a variety of outdoor activities at the lake with its numerous, well-maintained facilities available for enjoyment. For those who enjoy the outdoors, a visit to Crooked Creek Lake can be a rewarding experience. 
  • Cumberland River Basin Clean Marina Program

    The Cumberland River Basin Clean Marina Program is a voluntary program implemented by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and its watershed partners to promote environmentally responsible marina and boating practices. This program, established in support of the National Clean Boating Campaign, helps marina operators protect the very
  • Dale Hollow Lake

    The Nashville District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes you to Dale Hollow Lake. Dale Hollow Dam and Lake was authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1938 and the River and Harbor Act of 1946. The project was completed for flood control in 1943. Power generating units were added in 1948, 1949, and 1953. The project was designed by the
  • Deer Creek Lake

    Deer Creek Lake  was authorized by Section 4 of Flood Control Act of 1938. The primary project purposes are flood risk reduction, fish and wildlife enhancement, recreation, and low flow augmentation. There are three recreation areas at the project. The Corps of Engineers recreation areas include a day use area. Deer Creek State Park comprises most of the recreational facilities on the project.
  • Delaware Lake

    Delaware Lake  was authorized by Section 4 of Flood Control Act of 1938. The primary project purposes are flood risk reduction, low-flow augmentation, and recreation. There are four recreation areas at the project. The Corps of Engineers recreation areas include a day use area. Delaware State Park comprises most of the recreational facilities on the project.
  • Dewey Lake

    Dewey Lake is located just west of the Appalachian Mountains, with peaceful settings that offer camping and boating and numerous other outdoor recreation opportunities.
  • Dillon Lake

    Dillon Dam was completed in July 1961 and serves a drainage area of 748 square miles. Primary project purposes are flood risk reduction, low flow augmentation and recreation. Come take advantage of all our recreation opportunities. 
  • Dover Dam

    Dover Dam is within the Upper Tuscarawas section of the Muskingum Area. It was authorized by Section 4 of the Flood Control Act (FCA) of 1938, as amended by Section 4 of the FCA of 1939. Primary project purposes are flood damage reduction, recreation, and fish and wildlife. 
  • Drone Use

    Drone PolicyThe U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Drone Policy governs the operation and use of recreational unmanned aerial systems (UAS) at all Nashville District lakes within the Cumberland River Basin.The guidance has designated approved locations to fly drones for hobbyists, while at the same time prohibiting drones where people
  • East Branch Clarion River Lake

    In the heart of Elk County and scenic upper Clarion River Valley, the US Army Corps of Engineers invites you to visit and enjoy the ideal setting for a variety of recreational experiences. East Branch Lake is surrounded by Elk State Park, Elk State Forest and State Game Lands to further enhance the idyllic setting of your visit.
  • East Lynn Lake

    East Lynn Lake is located on the East Fork of Twelvepole Creek, 10 miles south of Wayne, WV, on State Route 37. East Lynn Lake was constructed primarily for flood control, water quality, fish management, and recreation. There is a total of 24,821 acres of project lands and waters at East Lynn.
  • Fishing

    Fishing Information“Planning where to go for the best in Tennessee fishing is like getting paid to eat candy,” says author and fisherman Vernon Summerlin in his Tennessee Sportsman article, “Tennessee 12-month Angling Planner.”  “Like a candy store,” says Summerlin, “Tennessee’s variety of fishing makes anglers drool.” *Used by permission of
  • Fishtrap Lake

    Fishtrap Lake lays deep within the valleys of the densely forested mountains of Kentucky. Boasting a multitude of recreational opportunities, the man-made lake and surrounding area is the perfect place to explore.
  • Golf Cart Policy

    Read the golf cart policy here.
  • Grayson Lake

    Grayson Lake was authorized by Section 203 of Flood Act of 1960. Primary project purposes are flood risk management, water quality, water supply and recreation. The dam was completed in January 1968 and serves a drainage area of 196 square miles. The lake is impounded by an earth and random rock-fill dam, 120 ft. tall and 1,460 ft. long with an uncontrolled, broad-crested saddle spillway located at the left abutment of the dam. The project has 6 recreation areas including Grayson Lake State Park.
  • Green River Lake

    Welcome to Green River Lake. The lake is situated in Adair and Taylor counties, lying amidst rolling terrain, steep bluffs and flowing streams in the section of Kentucky known as the Highland Rim.  The dam, located on the Green River, is an 11 mile drive from the cities of Campbellsville and Columbia, and less than 100 miles from Louisville and Lexington.
  • J. Edward Roush Lake

    The Upper Wabash Projects consisting of the Mississinewa, Salamonie, and J. Edward Roush lakes operate as a unit to reduce flood stages in the Upper Wabash Basin and with other lakes downstream in reduction of Lower Wabash and Ohio River floods. Together these three reservoir's have saved millions of dollars in flood damages. The Corps of Engineers has developed a partnership in the management of the public lands at the three lakes. Under lease agreements, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources operates and maintains the recreation facilities and wildlife areas at the lakes, with a few exceptions where the Corps of Engineers still maintains and operates.
  • J. Percy Priest Lake

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District welcomes you to J. Percy Priest Lake.  The lake provides a variety of outdoor recreational opportunities for millions of visitors each year.  Because of the temperate climate and relatively long recreation season, visitors have numerous activities to participate in including fishing, hunting,
  • John W. Flannagan Dam & Reservoir

    Authorized by Congress in the Flood control Act of 1938, and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1961, John W. Flannagan Dam and Reservoir is a part of the Big Sandy flood protection system. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers designed and supervised construction of the dam and now operates it for public benefits.
  • Kinzua Dam and Allegheny Reservoir

    Totally surrounded by forest, Kinzua Dam and Allegheny Reservoir are at the heart of one of the largest and most popular outdoor recreation complexes in the northeastern United States. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers invites you to visit the reservoir and discover a diversity of year-round recreational opportunities that will delight the outdoor enthusiast.
  • Lake Barkley

    The Nashville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes you to Lake Barkley, the westernmost project in a series of dams along the Cumberland River and its tributaries.
  • Lake Cumberland

    The Nashville District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes you to Lake Cumberland, the second largest lake in the Cumberland River System. The lake provides varied outdoor recreational opportunities for millions of visitors each year. Because of the temperate climate and relatively long recreation season, visitors have many opportunities to fish, hunt, camp, picnic, boat, canoe, hike, and enjoy the outdoors.
  • Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center

    The Lake Superior Maritime Visitor Center is located in the historic Canal Park, Duluth, Minnesota at the foot of the Aerial Lift Bridge. We offer world class viewing of shipping vessels entering and leaving the Duluth-Superior Harbor. We are dedicated to preserving the maritime history of the area. Stop by and be amazed by the vessels operating on the Great Lakes and the history behind it all!
  • Laurel River Lake

    The Nashville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes you to Laurel River Lake. Laurel River Lake, with its cliff-lined shores and quiet coves, is a favorite destination. Because of the temperate climate and relatively long recreation season, visitors have numerous activities from which to choose, including: fishing, camping, picnicking, boating, canoeing, hiking, horseback riding, diving and to relax at one of the deepest and cleanest lakes in Kentucky. Because of the lake's proximity to I-75 (20 minutes from Exit 25, 29, and 38) lakeside recreation can fit nicely into your other vacation plans.
  • Leesville Lake

    Leesville Lake is within the Upper Tuscarawas section of the Muskingum Area. It was authorized by Section 4 of the Flood Control Act (FCA) of 1938, as amended by Section 4 of the FCA of 1939. Primary project purposes are flood damage reduction, recreation, and fish and wildlife. The dam was completed in October 1936 and serves a drainage area of 48 square miles. Land includes 161 fee acres and 4,001 easement acres. There are no Corps operated recreation areas.
  • Loyalhanna Lake

    Located in southwestern Pennsylvania, among terrain characterized by its diversity, Loyalhanna Lake provides a mixture of scenery and recreational opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Pittsburgh District invites you to visit the Loyalhanna project and enjoy its natural settings.
  • Mahoning Creek Lake

    Situated among steep-sided valleys and forested hillsides, Mahoning Creek Lake is surrounded by the rugged and striking terrain of western Pennsylvania. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers invites you to discover Mahoning’s breathtaking scenery and its opportunities for outdoor recreation.
  • Marinas

    Commercial marinas provide a wide variety of services for visitors across the lakes. Services such as fuel, private boat moorage, electrical and water hookups, boat rentals, fishing and marine supplies, restaurants and snack bars, and restrooms are offered by most facilities. To encourage boaters to follow “No Discharge” policy regarding proper
  • Martins Fork Lake

    The Nashville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes you to Martins Fork Lake. The lake is located at river mile 15.6 on the Martins Fork of the Cumberland River in the scenic mountainous terrain of Harlan County, 13 miles southeast of the town of Harlan, Kentucky. Martins Fork Lake provides a variety of outdoor recreation opportunities including: fishing, hunting, picnicking, camping, sunbathing, hiking, and boating for thousands of visitors each year.
  • Michael J. Kirwan Dam and Reservoir

    Surrounded by the lush, green farmland of northern Ohio, the Michael J. Kirwan Dam provides miles of clean waters and scenic countryside for your enjoyment.
  • Mississinewa Lake

    The Upper Wabash Projects consisting of the Mississinewa, Salamonie, and J. Edward Roush lakes operate as a unit to reduce flood stages in the Upper Wabash Basin and with other lakes downstream in reduction of Lower Wabash and Ohio River floods. Together these three reservoir's have saved millions of dollars in flood damages. The Corps of Engineers has developed a partnership in the management of the public lands at the three lakes. Under lease agreements, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources operates and maintains the recreation facilities and wildlife areas at the lakes, with a few exceptions where the Corps of Engineers still maintains and operates.
  • Mohawk Dam

    Mohawk Dam is a dry dam and does not have a permanent pool, water is present when impounded during flood control operations. Since there is no constant water within Mohawk Dam, there are no recreational activities available. Below the dam, around the Walhonding River there are numerous recreational opportunities. 
  • Mohicanville Dam

    Built in 1935, Mohicanville Dam, a flood control project, is a dry dam with no permanent pool. The dam site is located on the Lakefork of the Mohican River in northeast Ohio, 171 miles above the mouth of the Muskingum River at Marietta, Ohio. 
  • Monroe Lake

    Welcome to the Monroe Lake web site. The lake lies predominantly in Monroe County and extends into Brown, Jackson, and Lawrence counties in south central Indiana. The dam is on Salt Creek 25.9 miles upstream of its juncture with the East Fork of White River, approximately 20 miles south and east of Bloomington.
  • Mosquito Creek Lake

    Amidst the panorama of rural countryside and the suburban settings of northeastern Ohio lies Mosquito Creek Lake. Mosquito Creek Lake is one of the most popular sites for outdoor recreation in the area, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers invites you to come and discover the wide range of recreational opportunities available for your enjoyment at the lake.
  • December

    Mount Morris Dam

    Mount Morris Dam and Recreation Area is a major flood control project and public park located on the Genesee River near the Village of Mount Morris in Livingston County, New York. The dam is situated deep in the Genesee River Gorge at the northern end of Letchworth State Park and provides flood protection to downstream areas including the city of Rochester. A recreation area is associated with the dam and offers a variety of recreational opportunities to the visiting public.
  • January

    Nashville District Firewood Policy

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District announces a new firewood policy is now in effect, and seeks the public’s cooperation to prevent the spread of forest insects and disease at campgrounds in the Cumberland River Basin.The new firewood policy requires visitors at Nashville District’s recreation areas, primitive campsites and 25
  • Nashville District Recreation

    Obtaining a PermitSpecial Event PermitsSpecial Event Permits are necessary for certain activities held on project lands and waters.  The types of events that require a permit are those that: affect the full and free use by the public of the public lands and waters of which the event is being held, require the exclusive use of any portion of
  • Nolin River Lake

    Welcome to Nolin River Lake. Nolin River Dam is located about 8 miles above the Confluence of the Nolin and Green Rivers near the community of Bee Spring.  While the dam is located in Edmonson County, the lake also covers portions of Grayson and Hart Counties.  The dam is about 8 miles north of Brownsville, 20 miles from Leitchfield, and 95 miles southwest of Louisville. In addition to flood control and recreational benefits, the lake also supplies drinking water to the surrounding area, as well as providing fish and wildlife habitat.
  • North Branch Kokosing River Lake

    Kokosing Dam was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood control, recreation and wildlife management. Kokosing River Lake is the perfect place for fishing, paddling and camping. You can also find 959 acres of wildlife habitat for hunting.
  • North Fork of Pound River Lake

    North Fork of Pound River Dam was authorized by Section 4 of Flood Control Act of 1938. Primary project purposes are flood risk reduction, water supply, fish and wildlife enhancement, and recreation. The dam was completed in January 1966 and serves a drainage area of 17.2 square miles.
  • Old Hickory Lake

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District welcomes you to Old Hickory Lake.Located near Metropolitan Nashville, Tenn., the lake provides a variety of outdoor recreational opportunities for millions of visitors each year. Because of the temperate climate and relatively long recreation season, visitors have numerous activities to choose
  • Paint Creek Lake

    Paint Creek Lake provides flood control (authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1938) for the communities along Paint Creek. In addition, it provides water supply for Highland Water Company, increases water flow downstream during low flow conditions, and provides recreational opportunities and wildlife habitat.
  • Paintsville Lake

    Paintsville Lake is a total of 1,139 surface acres. The US Army Corps of Engineers owns a total of 13,156 acres of land surrounding the lake with 57 miles of shoreline. The lake is approximately 18 miles in length. Paintsville Lake gleams like a jewel in the crown of the mountains of Eastern Kentucky. With steep cliffs and wooded coves along the shoreline. The lake provides 1,140 acres of boating, skiing and fishing pleasure. After a day on the lake, relax in the campground. For a glimpse into a vanished way of life, visit the Mountain Homeplace. This living history farm recreates Appalachian farm life in the mid-1800s.
  • Patoka Lake

    Welcome to Patoka Lake. The lake lies in Dubois, Crawford and Orange counties in southern Indiana. The dam is located approximately 118.3 miles above the mouth of the Patoka River, a tributary of the Wabash River approximately 12 miles northeast of Jasper, Ind. 
  • Piedmont Lake

    Piedmont Lake is within the Lower Tuscarawas section of the Muskingum Area. It was authorized by Section 4 of the Flood Control Act (FCA) of 1938, as amended by Section 4 of the FCA of 1939. Primary project purposes are flood damage reduction, recreation, and fish and wildlife. The dam was completed in May 1937 and serves a drainage area of 86 square miles. Land includes 111 fee acres and 6,615 easement acres. There are no Corps operated recreation areas.
  • Pleasant Hill Lake

    Pleasant Hill Dam is right in the middle of two major recreation areas; Mohican State Park and Mohican Memorial Forest below the dam and MWCD's Pleasant Hill Lake Park, created by the dam, above it. The dam and lake are located on the Clear Fork branch of the Mohican River, 6 miles west of Loudonville and 20 miles southeast of Mansfield, Ohio, in Ashland County. Pleasant Hill Dam was constructed for flood reduction, recreation and fish and wildlife management, it was complete in 1936.
  • R.D. Bailey Lake

    This project was called the Justice Reservoir, during the planning stages. In 1965, Congress changed the name in honor of the late Judge R.D. Bailey, a lawyer, state senator, prosecuting attorney, and a leader in Wyoming County education. Judge Bailey also was circuit judge of Wyoming and Mingo counties during the bloody coal mine wars of the 1920's.
  • Rough River Lake

    Welcome to Rough River Lake. The lake is situated in Breckinridge, Hardin, and Grayson counties in south central Kentucky. The dam is located on the Rough River near the community of Falls of Rough, about 20 miles from Leitchfield and 95 miles southwest of Louisville. The 5,100-acre Rough River Lake provides a wide variety of outdoor recreational opportunities. The Corps, in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky, manages Rough River Lake’s land and water for wildlife, fisheries and recreation. The menu on the right leads to specific recreation and other lake information.
  • Salamonie Lake

    The Upper Wabash Projects consisting of the Mississinewa, Salamonie, and J. Edward Roush lakes operate as a unit to reduce flood stages in the Upper Wabash Basin and with other lakes downstream in reduction of Lower Wabash and Ohio River floods. Together these three reservoir's have saved millions of dollars in flood damages. The Corps of Engineers has developed a partnership in the management of the public lands at the three lakes. Under lease agreements, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources operates and maintains the recreation facilities and wildlife areas at the lakes, with a few exceptions where the Corps of Engineers still maintains and operates.
  • Senecaville Lake

    Senecaville Lake Project, located in the southeast corner of Guernsey County and the northeast corner of Noble County, Ohio, is one of a system of projects designed to provide flood control and water conservation in the Muskingum Watershed in southeastern Ohio.
  • Shenango River Lake

    The scenic Shenango Recreation Area campground has 330 sites available, many of which are equipped with electric hookup. Showers, restrooms, playgrounds and dump stations are provided. Campers visiting the lake will enjoy the spacious facilities and ease of access to the lake, as well as opportunities to enjoy watching the birds and other wildlife that live there.
  • Soo Locks Visitor Center

    Discover the engineering marvels and maritime history of the world-renowned Soo Locks. Nestled in the heart of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, our center offers an immersive experience for visitors of all ages. Whether you're a history enthusiast, a maritime buff, or looking for a unique day out, the Soo Locks Visitor Center has something for everyone.
  • Stonewall Jackson Lake

    Stonewall Jackson Lake, nestled in the rolling hills of West Virginia, is easily accessible from Interstate 79. The lake is located in Lewis County, West Virginia, an area rich in history and Appalachian tradition. These factors combined with the scenic beauty of the area provide for excellent outdoor recreational opportunities.
  • Summersville Lake

    Summersville Dam was authorized by Section 4 of Flood Control Act of 1938. The primary project purposes are flood risk management, fish and wildlife enhancement, water quality, recreation, and low flow augmentation. The dam was completed in 1966 and serves a drainage area of 803 square miles. The dam is on the Gauley River near the town of Summersville in Nicholas County, WV, and controls a drainage area of 803 square miles. Summersville is the second largest rock-fill dam in the eastern United States.
  • Sutton Lake

    Sutton Lake covers 1440 acres. It is a beautiful lake, winding 14 miles along the Elk River, with many coves along its 40 miles of shoreline. The lake is 125 feet deep at the dam. Sutton Dam is located just above the Town of Sutton, 101 miles above the mouth of the Elk River in Charleston. It is a concrete-gravity structure 210 feet high, 1,178 feet long, and 195 feet wide at the base
  • Tappan Lake

    Tappan Lake is within the Lower Tuscarawas section of the Muskingum Area. It was authorized by Section 4 of the Flood Control Act (FCA) of 1938, as amended by Section 4 of the FCA of 1939. Primary project purposes are flood damage reduction, recreation, and fish and wildlife.
  • Taylorsville Lake

    Welcome to Taylorsville Lake. The Lake is located on the Salt River beginning at river mile 78 about 5 miles west of Glensboro and extends downstream to the dam at river mile 60.  The Lake is 18 miles long and extends into portions of Spencer, Nelson and Anderson Counties of Kentucky. 
  • Tionesta Lake

    Winding its way through the rugged hills of northwestern Pennsylvania, Tionesta Lake offers a unique setting for a diversity of outdoor recreational opportunities. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers invites you to visit the project and discover Tionesta's delightful lake and the natural beauty of the surrounding forest.
  • Tom Jenkins Dam

    Tom Jenkins Dam (Burr Oak Lake) is a multi-purpose flood control project built by the Corps of Engineers under the authority of the Flood Control Act of 1944. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers owns 100 acres of land surrounding Tom Jenkins Dam including a portion of Burr Oak Lake in front of the Dam. The Corps also purchased the rights to flood around the land around Burr Oak Lake up to an elevation of 750 feet.
  • Trails

    Trail Maps Accordian Bluff Black Walnut Kendall Red Oak RidgeCenter Hill Lake TrailsBUFFALO VALLEY TRAILLocated 5 miles from Interstate 40 at the Buffalo Valley Exit No. 268 and adjacent to the Center Hill Lake Resource Manager’s Office, this trail provides river access to the Caney Fork and is a very popular access area for trout fishermen. 
  • Tygart Lake

    Located in the picturesque West Virginia countryside, Tygart Lake's blue waters and irregular shoreline contrast with the surrounding steep mountain terrain. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers invites you to discover the beauty of Tygart Lake and its scenic vistas that provide the ideal setting for many outdoor recreational activities.
  • Union City Dam

    The Union City Dam provides visitors with the chance to enjoy a number of outdoor recreational opportunities. The different types of habitat and ecosystems that can be found at the reservoir provide hikers, bird watchers and the novice naturalist with a variety of flora and fauna to discover and enjoy.
  • Water Safety

    Water SafetyThe U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District welcomes your interest in water safety. We want to encourage visitors to our recreational facilities and lakes to use caution while boating, fishing, or swimming. Watch Your Children! Each year about 200 children drown in the U.S. and several thousand others are treated in hospitals
  • West Fork Lake

    Welcome to the West Fork Lake. Better known locally as Winton Woods Lake, the lake is situated in Hamilton County in southwestern Ohio within the metropolitan Cincinnati area. The 183-acre lake provides flood reduction and a whole lot more. West Fork Lake exists as a cooperative management effort between the Corps of Engineers and the Hamilton County Park District.
  • William H. Harsha Lake

    Welcome to the William H. Harsha Lake (also known as East Fork). The lake is situated in Clermont County in southwestern Ohio, about 25 miles east of Cincinnati.   The dam is about four miles south of Batavia, Ohio, on the East Fork of the Little Miami River. William H. Harsha exists as a cooperative management effort between the Corps of Engineers and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources - Divisions of Parks and Recreation, Watercraft, and Wildlife. A variety of other partnerships play important roles in the management of the 10,000 plus acres of public lands at William H. Harsha Lake.
  • Wills Creek Lake

    Wills Creek Lake serves as the Project Office for the projects located within the Lower Tuscarawas section of the Muskingum Area. Wills Creek Lake was authorized by Section 4 of the Flood Control Act (FCA) of 1938, as amended by Section 4 of the FCA of 1939. Primary project purposes are flood damage reduction, recreation, and fish and wildlife. The dam was completed in June 1936 and serves a drainage are of 724 square miles. Land includes 131 fee acres and 20,252 easement acres. The Corps operates two small day-use recreation areas.
  • Woodcock Creek Lake

    Placidly resting amidst gently rolling hills, Woodcock Creek Lake complements the tranquil rural countryside of central Crawford County.
  • Yatesville Lake

    Yatesville Lake was authorized by Section 204 of Flood Control Act of 1965. Primary project purposes are flood damage reduction, low flow augmentation, water quality and recreation. The dam was completed in 1988 and serves a drainage area of 208 square miles. There are six recreation areas including two Corps managed day use areas.
  • Youghiogheny River Lake

    In the heart of the Laurel Highlands and spanning the Mason-Dixon Line between Pennsylvania and Maryland lays Youghiogheny River Lake.