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  • Corps, Pirates to host PNC Park Water Safety Night 2024

    In partnership with the Pittsburgh Pirates, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District will host their “Water Safety Night” at PNC Park, May 11.
  • High winds, storms, wave action increase hazards

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, urges caution around Great Lakes harbor piers and breakwaters, particularly during high wind and wave events. Accidents can occur near harbor structures during turbulent weather late in the year. The lakeshore attracts residents and visitors who may not be aware of the powerful impacts strong winds and storms can bring to shorelines and harbor structures. “Although breakwater structures are built for navigation, they are often used for recreation,” said Chief of Operations and Maintenance Branch, Cindy Jarema. “Walking along breakwater structures can be hazardous – surfaces may be slippery and uneven, and wave action increases the risk of injury or falling into the water.”
  • Submerged stone wall in Ashtabula Harbor marked by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Buffalo District has marked a submerged stone wall in Ashtabula, Ohio to remind boaters of its presence inside Ashtabula Harbor’s East Breakwater.
  • Submerged stone wall in Ashtabula Harbor marked by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Buffalo District has marked a submerged stone wall in Ashtabula, Ohio to remind boaters of its presence inside Ashtabula Harbor’s East Breakwater. The 1,500 linear foot wall is now identified by nine red buoys with reflective tape, floating at water level approximately every 165 feet. The top of the submerged stone wall is approximately one to two feet below the water level. The wall creates an enclosed space not designed for boater access. For safety, boaters should stay in the bounds of the federal navigation channel until outside the harbor.
  • Army Corps of Engineers reminds visitors to practice water safety

    As millions of Americans plan visits to our nation’s lakes and rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of
  • Army Corps of Engineers promotes boat, water safety this summer

    DETROIT- With warm weather approaching, many will spend summer in or around the water. As Great Lakes stewards, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reminds visitors and residents the importance of practicing safe, sensible and thoughtful activities. Great Lakes water levels are below last year’s record levels but will continue rising before peaking in the summer months. High water levels can increase dangers such as rip currents and waves, especially during periods of active weather. The Corps of Engineers urges caution around Great Lakes piers and breakwaters, particularly during times of high winds and waves. People of all ages should always practice boat and water safety. Before entering or being around the water, keep these items listed below in mind, they could save your life or the life of someone you care about.
  • Army Corps of Engineers promotes water safety this summer season

    Warmer weather is almost here and that means millions of Americans will be planning visits to our nation’s lakes and rivers. As the steward of many of these public waters, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reminds visitors of the importance of practicing safe, sensible, and thoughtful activities in and around the water.
  • High water levels and wave events increase safety hazards

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers urges caution around Great Lake piers, breakwaters and jetties, particularly during times of high wind and wave events. Many accidents and incidents near harbor structures occur during the turbulent weather season late in the year and higher than normal water levels pose an added threat. The lakeshore attracts local residents and visitors alike and some may not be aware of the powerful impacts that strong winds, storms and high water levels can bring. Dangers of High Water Levels, Waves. The Great Lakes are experiencing higher than normal water levels, which bring safety hazards such as submerged breakwaters, dangerous rip currents and electric shock risks.
  • Breakwater safety hazards of high Great Lakes water levels

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District, strongly urges individuals to use caution around
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