Contractors working for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District install a 23-foot-tall concrete shaft enclosure weighing approximately 120,000 pounds as part of the guard wall at the Monongahela River Locks and Dam 4 in Charleroi, Pennsylvania, Nov. 16, 2023.

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  • December

    Headwaters Highlights: Elizabeth Locks and Dam crews keep navigation afloat through one of the oldest locks in the Nation

    The quiet waters of the Monongahela River may experience some explosive rumblings next summer. One of the oldest navigation dams in the nation is planned to go out with a blast in Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, after more than a century of service to the region.
  • August

    New commander assumes mission responsibility of Pittsburgh District

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District welcomed a new commander with the symbolic passing of the engineer flag during a ceremony at the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh, Aug. 4, 2023.
  • May

    Officials break ground on K-25 Viewing Platform

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. (May 11, 2023) – Officials broke ground today on a building that will provide a historic lookout over the footprint where the K-25 Building once stood and the Oak Ridge Diffusion Plant produced uranium during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. Dignitaries welcomed guests, made speeches, and shoveled dirt to officially kick off construction of the K-25 Viewing Platform at East Tennessee Technology Park.
  • March

    Communities spanning two counties dedicate Periwinkle Trail

    GRANVILLE, Tenn. (March 28, 2023) - The communities of Smith County, Jackson County and the “Friends of Cordell Hull Lake” dedicated Periwinkle Trail March 25, 2023, at the Indian Creek Archery Range trailhead. The newly constructed trail provides hikers a new path to experience the outdoors and creates a bond between the two counties.
  • November

    Hennepin Canal

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District, conducted a Lunch and Learn on the Hennepin Canal on October 21 to honor the 115th anniversary of its opening. It was led by Senior Geologist, Tim Flaherty who spent his own time throughout the years conducting research on this historically significant project.
  • March

    Women of the Pittsburgh District: Jessa Farmer

    In celebration of Women's History Month, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District is highlighting several of the many women in the district whose talent and expertise support our communities and our nation. Today we had a conversation with Jessa Farmer, Pittsburgh District's Geotechnical and Water Resources Branch Chief about her experiences and what Women's History Month means to her.
  • February

    Celebrating Black History Month

    Every February, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District joins the nation to observe and reflect on the tremendous contributions that African Americans have made to our country and our history. As 2022’s Black History Month ends, we took time to talk with some of our people and ask them about their experiences and perspectives that both empowered and shaped them. Although only three Black voices were interviewed, Black History Month is an opportunity for the corps to share some of our employees’ perspectives on Black history and what it means to them.
  • December

    A deep dive into the Louisville District dive team

    It’s not every day that your duty assignment requires work to take place under mirky water, but for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Louisville District dive team, it’s just another day on the job—and has been that way for decades.
  • October

    A History of FUDS - Formerly Used Defense Sites

    Have you ever wondered about the history of the Formerly Used Defense Sites and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers involvement? To get a better understanding of the FUDS program, let’s begin with a look at our country’s history.
  • June

    Marker highlights historical relevance of navigation lock

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (June 24, 2020) – The city of Nashville unveiled a historical marker today at the site of a navigation lock that went operational in 1907 to tame the Cumberland River, but where only remnants of its stonework remain visible on the shoreline.
Chick Lock

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