Contractors working for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District install a 23-foot-tall concrete shaft enclosure weighing approximately 120,000 pounds as part of the guard wall at the Monongahela River Locks and Dam 4 in Charleroi, Pennsylvania, Nov. 16, 2023.

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Chief of Operations retires from the Corps with 36 years of civilian service

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Great Lakes and Ohio River Division
Published Dec. 22, 2021
Updated: Dec. 22, 2021
On Monday, December 20, 2021, a retirement ceremony was held for William “Bill” R. Chapman III, who retired from his position as Chief of Operations for The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after 36 years of civilian service.

On Monday, December 20, 2021, a retirement ceremony was held for William “Bill” R. Chapman III, who retired from his position as Chief of Operations for The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after 36 years of civilian service.

On Monday, December 20, 2021, a retirement ceremony was held for William “Bill” R. Chapman III, who retired from his position as Chief of Operations for The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after 36 years of civilian service.

On Monday, December 20, 2021, a retirement ceremony was held for William “Bill” R. Chapman III, who retired from his position as Chief of Operations for The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after 36 years of civilian service.

On Monday, December 20, 2021, a retirement ceremony was held for William “Bill” R. Chapman III, who retired from his position as Chief of Operations for The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after 36 years of civilian service.

On Monday, December 20, 2021, a retirement ceremony was held for William “Bill” R. Chapman III, who retired from his position as Chief of Operations for The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after 36 years of civilian service.

On Monday, December 20, 2021, a retirement ceremony was held for William “Bill” R. Chapman III, who retired from his position as Chief of Operations for The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after 36 years of civilian service.

On Monday, December 20, 2021, a retirement ceremony was held for William “Bill” R. Chapman III, who retired from his position as Chief of Operations for The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after 36 years of civilian service.

It started with a childhood love for the ocean. Although the lakes and rivers he presided over weren’t nearly as vast as the open waters he remembers as a child, following his passion still lead him to 36 years of distinguished and celebrated civilian service.

On Monday, December 20, 2021, a retirement ceremony was held for William “Bill” R. Chapman III, who retired from his position as Chief of Operations for The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after 36 years of civilian service. Mr. Chapman’s two children, wife, and sister attended the event, along with friends and staff. The event was live steamed on Facebook live and Microsoft Teams for those who were unable to attend in-person.

“My father was in the Navy, and we lived in California. I loved the water,” said Chapman. “So, I wanted to be an oceanographer or something to do with that, because we lived on the beach when I was out there. Well, we came back to Kentucky… and there’s no oceans in Kentucky, but the next closest thing is the rivers and lakes. Who has that? The corps.”

Chapman received numerous awards and gifts for his long career with the corps. On behalf of the Great Lakes and Ohio River Division, Regional Programs Director, Mr. Steve Durrett, gifted Chapman a frame of two notable accomplishments; Olmsted Lock and Dam and the Soo Locks, both very large projects that were executed while he was Chief of Operations at the division. The frame also includes coins from each of the seven districts, as well as the division coin.

Division Commander, Col. Kimberly Peeples, was also in attendance at the ceremony. Col. Peeples gifted Chapman the Superior Civilian Service Medal, as well as the very prestigious Bronze Order of the De Fleury Medal.

“What the De Fleury represents is the best of our regiment,” said Col. Peeples. “It states that engineers lead the way, that we’re courageous and bold. As I was reading back on the history of the medal, I see that it’s you. You have lead the way. It’s what you’ve done for your entire career, on our military projects, fortifications, and always keeping the people that do what we do number one in your heart. I want to commend you on your lifetime of service.”

Upon receiving the awards and gifts, Chapman emphasized his passion toward making a difference, and cherishing all of the impactful relationships he made throughout his long career. 

“It’s about the people. It’s about the relationships you have. That’s the most important thing – taking care of those people, and never forgetting where you come from,” said Chapman. “I wanted to move the corps ahead. I wanted to make a difference”

To view the entire ceremony, visit our Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/USACELRD/. 


Chick Lock

Through deeds, not words, we are BUILDING STRONG®