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  • USACE Great Lakes & Ohio River Division Virtual Recruitment Event

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Great Lakes and Ohio River's seven districts, including Buffalo, Chicago, Detroit, Louisville, Huntington, Nashville, and Pittsburgh, are hosting a virtual hiring event.
  • Corps of Engineers share May-Oct. water level outlook

    U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydraulics and Hydrology officials forecast Great Lakes water levels to continue seasonal rise. From the shores of Lake Superior, Detroit District Watershed Hydrology Section Chief Keith Kompoltowicz discusses the latest six-month water level forecast in the seventh ‘On the Level’ video, available on the district’s YouTube page at https://youtu.be/imwYDUBbMd0. “Lake Superior’s water level in April was about an inch below its long-term average,” according to Kompoltowicz. “Looking at the forecast for the next 6 months, Superior’s level should remain near average. In looking at the rest of the Great Lakes system, Lakes Michigan-Huron, St. Clair, Erie and Ontario are above their respective long term average levels, but well below the record high levels recently experienced.”
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Leasing Tugboat to Serve Great Lakes for Next Five Years

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Buffalo District awarded a $8.4 million contract to Cleveland-based Great Lakes Towing on April 20 for lease of the tugboat Don Raul to serve on the Great Lakes. The boat will primarily be used on Lake Erie between Buffalo, N.Y. and Toledo, Ohio, but may serve all the way to Massena, N.Y., towing the Buffalo District’s repair fleet. The fleet is one of three strategically located across the Great Lakes, providing a flexible, rapid response for maintenance at United States harbors and along the nation’s shorelines.
  • Scenarios product provides insight to potential future water levels

    DETROIT- Using historical data similar to recent conditions, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Future Scenarios product illustrates Great Lakes’ water level variabilities. “The tool allows us to investigate the different meteorological or hydrological conditions impacting the Great Lakes basin and how it affects water levels,” said Detroit District Watershed Hydrology Section Physical Scientist Deanna Apps. “You may find this product helpful to better understand the variability in water levels that could occur under certain scenarios.” Apps, who is also a lead water level forecaster explains the scenario-based tool that is publicly available on the Corps of Engineers’ website in the sixth ‘On the Level’ video, available on the Detroit District’s YouTube page at: https://youtu.be/Jyl8RkNBIy0.
  • Army Civil Works Studies, Projects and Programs to Be Accomplished with Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Funding

    The U.S. Army announced today the Civil Works studies, projects and programs that the Corps would implement in Fiscal Year 2022 with the $22.81 billion in supplemental funding provided in two recently enacted laws — the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act; and the 2022 Disaster Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act.
  • Measuring Great Lakes flows helps forecast water levels

    DETROIT- Monitoring the amount of water moving through the Great Lakes system is important to help forecast Great Lakes water levels and support international monitoring efforts. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials physically measure discharge, or flow, in the connecting channels using acoustic technology. Monthly flow in the connecting channels is the largest contributing factor to the level of each Great Lake and is a critical piece in forecasting Great Lakes water levels. Detroit District Hydraulic Engineer, Matt McClerren demonstrates flow measurement on the Detroit River and how the Corps of Engineers estimates monthly flows the fifth ‘On the Level’ video, available on the district’s website at https://go.usa.gov/xFEWx.
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District completes significant repair of Buffalo North Breakwater

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Buffalo District and its contractor, Michigan-based Ryba Marine Construction Co., have completed repairs to the section of the Buffalo North Breakwater breached by a severe storm in October 2019. The storm caused extensive damage to the approximately 2,200-foot breakwater structure, including the 300-foot breach in the north end. Fixing its crest and slopes using a rubble mound armor stone overlay, the breach was repaired in less than two months.
  • Corps of Engineers video explains monthly water level bulletin

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers releases its second ‘On the Level,’ Great Lakes water level and forecast video today. Great Lakes Watershed Hydrology Chief Keith Kompoltowicz talks through interpreting the Detroit District’s most popular product, the Great Lakes water levels monthly bulletin. Property owners, boaters, industries and many others use the bulletin as a source for water level information. “Each lake’s water level is portrayed in a hydrograph, or a plot of water surface elevation over time,” according to Kompoltowicz. “The District is happy to offer this edition of ‘On the Level’ to help anyone better understand the information the Corps of Engineers regularly provides.”
  • Corps of Engineers debuts video series

    DETROIT- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers releases a new Great Lakes water level video series today. ‘On the Level’ will provide monthly information and updates about the Great Lakes’ water levels and forecasts from Detroit District Hydraulics and Hydrology experts. “Our team is always looking for new ways to share information about the Great Lakes water levels and we are really looking forward to adding the ‘On the Level’ video series to our repertoire,” said district Great Lakes Watershed Hydrology Chief Keith Kompoltowicz. “We plan to share a wide variety of material and we hope folks will look forward to them every month.”
  • Great Lakes water levels below recent years record high levels

    DETROIT- Even with a return to wetter conditions in late June and July, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers officials expect Great Lakes water levels to remain below 2019 and 2020 levels - when many record highs were set across the lakes. Late spring and summer are typically when the lakes reach seasonal peaks before beginning seasonal declines in the late summer or early fall. This year, seasonal rises leading up to peak levels were less than average on all the lakes. This is especially true for Lake Michigan-Huron, which experienced its peak monthly mean level for the year in January. This has only occurred three other times (1931, 1958 and 1987) in the coordinated water level period of record (1918-2020).
Chick Lock

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